Modern Art & Government – 98 Balls of Wool $185K & $11M Rock

7 thoughts on “Modern Art & Government – 98 Balls of Wool $185K & $11M Rock”

    1. I don’t mean to be harsh on ‘modern art’ as some may see the appeal in it, and that I understand. I wouldn’t mind if an individual spent their own money on such pieces. However, when such art is favoured by the state it is at the expense of other forms and mostly misdirect resources while increasing taxes. A free market would prevent such malinvestment as it would eliminate special interests, where the people making art decisions would now have a profit motive which guides better art investments for society.

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      1. The establishment seems to exclude the old ways of art and push “modern” art on students. People going to art universities graduate without the most basic skill of drawing. It’s the same as graduating from high school without learning to read. It seems like laziness to me. They want to trace a photo. And 99% of all representational art out there is traced. The professors in the universities trace photos. I’d teach drawing, but I doubt people would take a class from me. It’s a cult of personality. Skill isn’t recognized. It’s ok to be harsh on modern art. Why try to spare the feelings of judges who don’t want the public to see the ways of the masters. We have to (metaphorically speaking,) stomp hard on their toes to get noticed.

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      2. Thanks for replying. It is a shame for art students or any student at university nowadays, having to be subject to this sort of instruction. I’m not even an art student yet even I can see when a university is pushing some curriculum or textbook on students just so they can receive more funding. A degree being devoid of essential and foundational knowledge to guide judgement is not worth the paper it is wrote on to anyone. What advice would you give an art student who is constrained by this sway? I’m an economics major, however I was lucky enough to be taught all the theories and could decide on what I believed true, Keynesianism is to economics as modern art is to art.

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      3. yes, what you’re saying makes sense. I’m not too hip on economics, but outsiders can see when something is a waste of money, like an art education. I don’t know why it happened. It was just a fluke of the universe, I’m one of the few in the country with a classical art education. The only reason I went to York academy of Arts is because they accepted everyone who could pay. hahahha They forced us into drawing and painting in the ways of the old masters, or I’d never have learned it either, because it requires time and practice, and young people don’t have the time or self discipline to follow that path unless they get forced on it by their teachers. The critiques were harsh. It made us a little tougher, and gives an artist an attitude of not caring about criticism. I see some artists can draw, but not many. The universities don’t want to hurt the sensitive students feelings these days, or maybe they can’t teach what they don’t know. You said it, a degree being devoid, that nails it. But I heard it’s not just art degrees that are a waste of money, the whole system is going down in standards. How can we fix it?

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      4. The problem is that the majority are taught bad theories stemming from standard one-size fits all curriculum, however I would say you are already doing your part to help fix the problem as for your website (educating people about art) and choosing a private university (encouraging better standards of education). 🙂

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      5. Thanks for the vote of confidence. I wish I could make a difference in the art world, but I doubt it. Since I don’t get prizes or sales, I’m an amateur, and my opinion doesn’t count in real life. But when I see a respected man talking about why modern art is failing us, I jump in on the conversation if I can.

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